To help in your decision making for selecting a tree, these entries have been divided three categories:

  • Small trees, under 30 feet in height need an area of less 120 square feet
  • Medium trees, 30-60 feet in height need an area of less than 180 square feet
  • Large trees, up to and over 70 feet in height need an area of over 180 square feet

Our Best of Trees for Parker County recommends only drought tolerant specimens. Granted, every tree needs an ample amount of water the first year of growth or during the time the tree is getting established. After that period, the tree should be able to do well with rainfall, and minimal irrigation. When picking a tree for your lawn, take time to do your homework. Decide if you want the tree for aesthetics, privacy, or have a purpose, such as, blocking an unsightly view. Consider the growing rate of the tree. All trees will take some time to mature and accomplish your goal. Some will take much longer than others. Remember, you do not want a tree that will over power the surrounding landscape or be a burden by needing continued attention. The list provided are trees that Parker County Master Gardeners prefer.

 

 

Bur Oak

Bur Oak - Quercus macrocarpa

A  large deciduous tree being able to reach 80 feet in height; however, the spread is generally less than 30 feet when mature. The leaf of a Bur Oak can be 12 inches long and over 4 inches wide and have different shapes on a single tree.

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Mexican Plum

Mexican Plum, Prunus mexicana

Mexican plum is a beautiful single-trunk, spring-flowering small tree with bark that eventually gets dark and striated, peeling off in patches. It gets as tall as 25 feet and is fast-growing, making it a good tree for new landscapes.

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Crape Myrtle

Crapemyrtle Lagerstroemia indica

Yes, Crape Myrtles come in sizes from 2 foot to 25 foot. For a recommendation in the tree section of this website, the discussion will embrace the larger 20 plus feet specimens.

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Arizona Cypress

Arizona Cypress Cupressus arizonica ssp. arizonica

This is a native Texas evergreen with a height of up to 90 feet. The trunk generally reaches 2 feet in diameter and will have unique blue-gray foliage. The tree can be seen in the natural settings of deep west Texas and Big Bend National Park.

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